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Mon 21

Poetry Workshop

August 21 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Tue 22

Social Security Orientation – Missoula

August 22 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Tue 22

Ravalli People First

August 22 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

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SDPAS Consumer & Caregiver Corner

Spring Cleaning: Why bother?

It has been said, and it is also very true, “Cleanliness is next to impossible.” However, living in a fairly clean and uncluttered space has many and various health benefits. It will help clear your home of dust, mold, bacteria and viruses that can have a negative impact on your physical health.

Also, “a cluttered and unclean living space:

• Robs us socially …when we’re too embarrassed to have people over.
• Robs us spiritually …because we can’t be at peace in a cluttered home.
• Robs us psychologically …by stealing our ability to feel motivated in our space,” according to Peter Walsh, an organizational expert.

Spring cleaning will make your home safer too-for yourself and your family, caregivers and guests.

Here are some ideas to help get you started:

Schedule it.
Just like a doctor’s appointment or other important commitment, block off time in your schedule that you can devote to spring cleaning. Instead of a dedicated chore day, clean just one room a day.
If it still seems like a monumental task, even 15 minutes a day devoted to cleaning and de-cluttering will make a big difference.

Make a checklist.
For each room in the home (and don’t forget the stairways and hallways), list the tasks you want to complete. This will help break down the chores into ‘doable’ steps. Keep it simple! Stick to three or four tasks for each room.

For example:

Living Room:
Recycle old newspapers and magazines
They are a safety hazard if they are blocking your movement in your home. Bag them up and move them out!
De-clutter
This is difficult for most people. If you tend to accumulate possessions and you don’t want to get rid of them, think about carefully storing half of them in bins or boxes. Rotate the stored and displayed items a couple of times a year. You will be surprised at how much more you will appreciate them.
Dust and Vacuum
Using a damp cloth keeps the dust from scattering. To dust high and low places without bending and stooping, make a handy dust mop by attaching your dust rag (or an old cotton sock) to a gift-wrap tube or a yardstick.

Kitchen:
Clean out ‘junk’ drawers
Wash sink
De-clutter and wash countertops and floors
Clean refrigerator; throw away any expired food

Bedroom:
De-clutter (Be sure to check under your bed. That’s where dust bunnies like to breed!)
Vacuum and dust
Wash linens
Bathroom:
Clean out the medicine cabinet and dispose of expired medications
De-clutter and wash countertops and floors
Clean commode, tub and sink

Note: Let cleaning solutions work for you. Once you apply a cleaning solution, let it attack the grime for a few minutes, then come back to wipe up or scrub. Make sure your pets don’t lick the area!

This article was compiled from the following online resources; please refer to them for more information:

AARP.com
Arthritistoday.com
Caregiverstress.com
Flylady.net
Lizzyannescleaning.com
Oprah.com/spirit/Peter-Walshs-Secrets-to-Cleaning-Up-Mess-and-Clutter

By | 2016-10-31T23:23:39+00:00 March 15th, 2014|Montana|Comments Off on SDPAS Consumer & Caregiver Corner

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